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DC Universe: Rebirth - The Deluxe Edition h/c


DC Universe: Rebirth - The Deluxe Edition h/c DC Universe: Rebirth - The Deluxe Edition h/c DC Universe: Rebirth - The Deluxe Edition h/c

DC Universe: Rebirth - The Deluxe Edition h/c back

Geoff Johns & Gary Frank, Ethan Van Sciver, Ivan Reis, Phil Jimenez

Price: 
15.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"There's going to be a war between hope and despair.
"Love and apathy.
"Faith and disbelief.
"When I was outside of time I felt their presence.
"I tried to see who it was.
"I couldn't, but I know they're out there.
"And they're waiting to attack again for some reason.
"I can feel it.
"Even now, Barry...
"... we're being watched."

If you're the one remaining person on Earth-33 (New 52 Multiverse designation) who doesn't know the twist at the end of this DCU reboot opener, which, rather neatly to be honest, explains why the entire New 52 Multiverse was a... fabrication... I'm not sure I can actually review this without spoiling it for you so I'm not even going to try. The implication is that Dr. Manhattan, yes he of WATCHMEN fame, was unbeknownst to anyone, responsible for hijacking events during the resolution of FLASHPOINT, and ensuring that reality took a different turn resulting in the creation of the New 52 Multiverse.

It's a ballsy move by Geoff Johns, which is sure to antagonise as many people as it delights, but given he's now moving on to take up the position of co-overlord of the DC Film division it's up to everyone else to step into his sizeable scribe shoes and follow the blazing path he's set with this revelatory one-shot. It think that'll be tricky given this is easily his best bit of writing (possibly his best full stop) since his exemplary extended run on GREEN LANTERN which perhaps co-incidentally, or perhaps not, began with a mini-series entitled GREEN LANTERN: REBIRTH...

Interestingly that particular rebirth brought back someone the fans had long been clamouring for the return of but which seemed impossible for reasons I really don't need to elaborate on, in the form of Hal Jordan. And here, Johns performs the same trick again, as the Scarlet, well ginger, speedster Wally West, last seen during Johns' BLACKEST NIGHT before apparently ceasing to exist when the New 52 came into being post-FLASHPOINT (also penned by Johns), is trying to break back into the DCU. Where has he been for the last several years? Well, Johns' makes good use of the Flash fact that unlike all the other myriad speedsters Wally couldn't be separated from the Speed Force, so has merely been lost there for ten years due to the mysterious meddlings of who we now assume to be Doctor Manhattan.

Wally therefore is the thread quite literally running through this entire story as he tries desperately to find one of his friends, even one of his enemies, who might, despite their minds - indeed entire reality - being altered, somehow remember him and bring him back. His problem is that to all intents and purposes everyone he has ever known has absolutely no idea he even existed. As he zooms from locale to locale, allowing us readers glimpses of what is to come for all the major characters in their own 'rebirths', his connection to the real world becomes ever more tenuous as he faces the prospect of physical disincorporation and completely merging with the Speed Force, to become nothing but fuel for other speedsters to tap into.

Even his beloved Linda, ten years younger than he remembers (as everyone is, again due to the mysterious meddling, conveniently explaining how all the heroes had their ages reset when the New 52 started) simply has no recollection of who he is. That only leaves Uncle Barry, the original Flash. Wally knows not even Barry will be able to rescue him, but he feels he needs to say his thanks to his inspiration and mentor then say goodbye before he disappears forever.

Which is the point at which I had to reach for my hankie... or to paraphrase a certain well known DC tagline, you will believe a man can cry... Forget the hyperbole of the Watchmen connection, the real heart-wrenching gooey emotional centre of this yarn is Wally himself, plus the promise of what's to come for the characters themselves. I came into this Rebirth one-shot full of cynicism and a heavy heart, my DC reading over the last few years having tailed off to simply Scott Snyder's BATMAN and nothing else, but you know what, I was actually inspired to give the new slate of Rebirth titles a try.

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