Fiction  > Fantasy  > Other by A to Z  > P - Z

Panther h/c


Panther h/c Panther h/c Panther h/c Panther h/c Panther h/c

Panther h/c back

Brecht Evens

Price: 
19.98

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"ROOAARR.... Oh! Are you the little girl I heard crying?"
"Um... yes."
"What's troubling your heart, my child?"
"Lucy... my kitty... she's dead."
"Rooaarr, how dreadful! Was it some kind of automobile?"
"Sniff. No. The vet..."
"Those quacks! I am so sorry... Here, take my handkerchief."
"Sniff. Who are you?"
"Ah! Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Octavianus Abracadolphus Pantherius, Crown Prince of Pantherland! But you can call me Panther!"
"How did you get into my dresser?"
"Rooaarr! We Panthers go wherever we please!"
"But Pantherland... That's not a real country, is it?"
"Not a real country? Christine, how dare you?"
"How do you know my name? I didn't tell you my name."
"Mmm?"

Well... this wasn't what I expected... and yet reflecting back to Brecht's first work, the now-out-of-print NIGHT ANIMALS, it makes much sense. I was expecting something hilariously farcical akin to his two most recent works, THE WRONG PLACE and THE MAKING OF. This does have a lot of ridiculous humour in places, but there's a very dark undercurrent here that left me feeling rather unsettled and uneasy upon its conclusion. Which, I should add, will be entirely what Brecht Evens intended.

Casting my mind back to NIGHT ANIMALS, where a young girl suddenly spontaneously matures physically, experiences her first period, and is whisked away from her soft toy strewn bed by the Devil to a wild orgy full of terrifying creatures in a forest, before she vanishes forever inside a strange birdman, there are clearly some parallels here. Askance ones at least.

For whilst the titular Panther may on the surface appear to be a captivating, charismatic, magical creature, who only appears to a young girl called Christine, living alone with just her father, her mother having left for reasons unknown and mourning the recent loss of her dead cat Lucy, by the time you finish this work, you'll have a hard time not concluding that in fact the Panther is a sexual predator, grooming Christine. You might also find it difficult not to conclude that the Panther is her father... I have on the other hand heard it suggested that this is a story of initial sexual awakening, emergence from adolescence, and the Panther is indeed merely an internal representative figure. Much like NIGHT ANIMALS, then. But, as I say, it's all very ambiguous, right to the very end...

What isn't in doubt is that this is another Evens masterpiece, both in terms of storytelling and the art. You will find yourself squirming in your seat as Panther ingratiates himself further into Christine's life, appearing as he only does in her bedroom, presenting himself as an understanding ear to bend and furry friend to play with. You can always tell, though, that he is being somewhat parsimonious with the truth. When not being downright evasive...

Art-wise, well, wow! The cover is an extremely accurate representation of the kaleidoscopic illustrations you will find within. Already one of the most unique and inventive artists out there, Brecht has taken it to new levels here. What also furthers the discomfort regarding the identity of the Panther is his amorphous features, indeed his entire head, and also sometimes even his body. They are constantly changing, transforming completely, to perfectly fit the moment in terms of expression and emotion, usually to evoke a reaction from Christine, and sometimes slipping quite perturbingly when he knows she can't see. Occasionally it's even three or four times within a single illustration in a kind of time lapse movement that's quite the accomplished visual treat.

Once again Brecht also eschews the need for panel or page borders, indeed even pencils, just getting his watercolours straight down on the page. It adds a certain fairytale quality here in places. Overall, between the psychedelic art and the frenetic, fluid, false showman that is the Panther, there is a real Alice In Wonderland feel to this work. I closed the book feeling disturbed and delighted in equal measure. I have no idea what drove Brecht to write this particular work, but I can't deny it's a compellingly cruel story.
This item is temporarily out of stock, but we should receive more stock in a few days.
You can still order this item, but if ordering with in stock items please just tell us whether to split your delivery in the 'Request Split Delivery' text box during checkout. Thanks!

spacer