Fiction  > Vertigo  > Unfollow

Unfollow vol 1


Unfollow vol 1 Unfollow vol 1 Unfollow vol 1 Unfollow vol 1

Unfollow vol 1 back

Rob Williams & Michael Dowling, R.M. Guera

Price: 
10.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"It's okay Rees, I removed your name from the 140."
"Okay! You got me! You caught me, all right! I added myself to the 140 list... But you need me, Rubenstein. I programmed the app. You need me... You... Oh Christ... You're going to do it, aren't you?"
... CRACK...
"One hundred forty characters. Now it can begin."

Larry Ferrel is rich. Very rich. To the tune of 17 billion dollars, made through building social media platforms. He is also dying of pancreatic cancer. Which is why he has decided to donate his money. All of it. To 140 lucky people. That's 120 million dollars each... I should probably add for the benefit of those of you unfamiliar with Twitter, 140 is the number of characters that a single tweet can contain, presumably explaining the conceit of the title.

But given it all starts with the execution of one of Larry's loyal - well, not-so-loyal, actually - employees, by his gun-toting right-hand man Rubenstein, wearing an Aztec priest's golden mask, the 120 million dollars is, one would suspect, going to come with a few strings attached. Such as possibly not living long enough to spend it.

And indeed once the 140 are all flown to Ferrel's tropical island by a fleet of private jets the first catch rapidly starts to become painfully clear...

"You have all received an app on your phones and computers. It states the number of you left alive, currently 139...
"If the number shrinks to, say 138, your app will register this... your share will increase.
"And hypothetically, of course, were only one of you to be left alive, that individual would receive all of my money.
"In such a hypothetical scenario, that lone survivor would receive 18.42 billion dollars.
"All he would have to do is kill 138 people.
"But it's not as if any of you would be willing to do that.
"Is it?"

So, I initially thought, we were going to be in very familiar Battle Royale-style territory, and indeed we are to a degree, especially given Ferrel's stipulation that once he's passed on to the great unknown and his loot been divvied up, if one of the 140 dies their money will be automatically returned to Ferrel's estate and shared out again amongst the remaining survivors. At least that's what Rubenstein says Ferrel wants... I can't help getting a strong sense he might have his own deranged agenda going on, though. I mean, anyone wondering around in a terrifying shiny mask waving a weapon around is probably up to no good. But there's a lot, lot more happening as well, such as the appearance of talking animal spirits to at least two of the 'winners'. Quite how that factors in is, at this point, a complete mystery.

Then there's the fact that the 140 don't seem to be have been picked entirely at random, if at all. For example there's a cross-dressing, blade-prosthetic-wearing, facially tattooed Japanese author who has noticed there are startling similarities between the plot of one of his novels and their current predicament. When he challenges Ferrel on this and receives acknowledgement that indeed he took inspiration from the book, it provokes the author to tell Ferrel he will do everything in his power to ensure the actual ending of the book doesn't happen. Ominous.

My personal favourite, though, is the heavily armed former special forces solider who believes God is speaking to him and the Dragon who needs to be combated is everywhere. And indeed the final issue of this arc is mainly a flashback concerning his chequered history. The phrase wild card certainly springs to mind! This issue was an interesting change of pace and I suspect will be repeated from time to time with different characters. So by the end of this first volume we've probably only really been properly introduced to four or five of the 140, and we haven't, ahem, lost too many yet. Just as well because I'm really enjoying this and I'd like it to run to several volumes! I can also see exactly why it was almost immediately picked up for a television show.

Art-wise, I can see some hints of Frank Quitely in Michael Dowling's work, but the person I am mostly strongly minded of is Arthur MAZEWORLD (and sadly currently out of print BUTTONMAN) Ranson. It's in the black linework, particularly the faces. Great opening volume, and this is exactly the high quality material Vertigo need to get back to putting out consistently if they want to seriously compete with the likes of Image.

spacer