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Exo h/c


Exo h/c Exo h/c Exo h/c

Exo h/c back

Jerry Frissen & Philippe Scoffoni

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Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"We're nearly there."
"What?! "We're nearly there?" Does the lieutenant come here a lot?"
"Maybe he knows some cool bar behind that big boulder over there?"

I'd be up for visiting a bar on the moon...

It's not a bar, obviously...

Jerry Frisson, who collaborated on writing duties with Alexandro Jodorowsky on the recent new METABARON material returns solo here with a hard sci-fi yarn about a covert alien invasion of Earth, and all manner of other lunar-based malarky.

In the best tradition of covert alien invasions of Earth, the extraterrestrial excursionists are bodysnatchers, but it's not long before the visitors come to the attention of NASA. Partly because an orbital space station gets attacked by a mysterious weapon fired from the dark side of the moon, thus requiring a cadre of marines to be dispatched to investigate, setting everyone on high alert for anything unusual. Like, you know, a covert alien invasion. How are the two events connected? And what on Earth, and the Moon, is going on?

Can it all possibly have anything to do with NASA's recent announcement that they've discovered an exoplanet so likely to harbour life they've named it Darwin II? By reprogramming an existing probe already out in the big beyond since 1996 to get there within a mere 2 years, rather than the 40 years it would take a new mission, they are utterly convinced they will finally discover alien life. Too late, it's already here!!

It's up to John Koenig (surely a cheeky nod to Walter?), the 'bad boy of NASA himself' to puzzle it all out! I should probably add that John didn't award himself that particular honorific, it was in fact his daughter Io's ex-boyfriend, the fabulously bemulleted Peter, just before he medicined John good and proper with some peyote tea, to prevent him from retrieving his daughter. This stupid, seemingly random action will in fact prove to be a pivotal plot point...

John's subsequent intuitive flashbacks are probably where my suspension of disbelief was most tested during this work, which is saying something given the epic journey Frisson takes us on, but overall it's an fabulously entertaining romp which is in the best traditions of a huge (good) Hollywood sci-fi blockbuster, so I guess I can forgive the odd tenuous plot device that makes all the crazy stuff hang together.

The parallel strands of tension on terra firma - and then underwater just for a bit of additional Abyss-style alien action - and the moon that develop, kept me completely intrigued before they dovetailed neatly, as we get the big reveals piling up rapidly during the conclusion. Though, the final few pages did feel slightly rushed, almost as though a couple of key explicative scenes were missing. I'm not one for unnecessary exposition, but we really could have done with a touch more here right at the death. I actually checked to see whether I hadn't turned over a few pages at the same time by mistake in my excitement. A case of rapidly diminishing page count, I suspect! Anyway, a very minor gripe.

The art from Phillippe Scoffoni, who is new to me, I must confess, is truly excellent, exactly what you'd want and expect from a Humanoids book. Precise ligne claire, really detailed linework, with a wonderfully natural colour palette. I'm probably most minded of François BOUNCER Boucq as a point of comparison, but I really hope Scoffoni does more for Humanoids, his art is an absolute pleasure to look at.

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