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Infinite Dark vol 1 s/c


Infinite Dark vol 1 s/c Infinite Dark vol 1 s/c Infinite Dark vol 1 s/c

Infinite Dark vol 1 s/c back

Ryan Cady & Andrea Mutti

Price: 
14.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"What were we seeing back there? That was an incredibly violent reaction, Deva... Do you want to talk to me about it?"
"The simulation degraded and a fucking shadow monster attacked me... what did you expect me to do?"
"You know that nothing in the sims can hurt us. I think there's more to your reaction than just fight or flight. You just came face-to-face with The Black. Pure entropy. And it's affected you."

It's hard to read in the dark, particularly the infinite kind of dark after the heat death of the universe, I would imagine. But it wasn't hard to read this horror sci-fi mash-up; in fact I rather enjoyed it. Here is the invitation to the grand finale of existence and the after party from the publisher...

"The universe ended, but humanity survived. And for years, the passengers and crew of the vessel Orpheus found the endless void between realities to be a surprisingly peaceful home. Then they found a body - bloodied, brutalized, and surrounded by inscrutable runes. As Security Director Deva Karrell investigates the Orpheus' first murder, she'll come face-to-face with a horror from beyond the confines of time itself…"

If you are a fan of the likes of the classic schlock horror sci-fi film Event Horizon from 1997 with its tagline "Infinite Space, Infinite Terror", this will be perfect for you. In comics sci-fi horror terms, I would say this falls between Garth Ennis and Facundo Percio's CALIBAN and Dan Abnett and Ian Culbard's BRINK. In horror terms, it is much more brooding and involved than the all-out gutripper that is CALIBAN, but isn't as mysteriously engrossing and indeed clever as BRINK.

But it's jolly good fun for what it is. Except for the characters trapped on the vessel Orpheus, obviously... with what appears to be their imaginations running riot and meltdowns occurring with increasing rapidity. No, it's becoming a total living nightmare for them. Surely there couldn't be anything else out there could there, because there is no out there...?

I thought the premise was genuinely creepy, how can the end of all reality as we know it possibly not be? The science aspects of how a tiny fraction of humanity has managed to survive it was well thought through, being sufficiently plausible (in science fiction terms at least) to suspend my disbelief. The horror element, when we finally get the explanation of that, works, just about, but then most horror of this type usually has some aspect of the preposterous to it, once you get right down to it. Ultimately this is reasonably well written entertaining slightly middle of the road fright-fun from Ryan Cady.

It actually feels like the end of this arc should be the end of the whole thing as it has a certain finality to it. Yet I note a new arc has been solicited and I can say I will be reading it. So he clearly has done enough to hook me.

Art-wise, Andrea ROME WEST / REBELS Mutti has also turned his hand to science fiction before on Zack Kaplan's PORT EARTH, which I also note is finally coming back for more issues later this year. His crisp art combined with an eerie palette of aquamarine, cyan, pale blues and many other such colours in which dark shadows can hide and murderously emerge from - if they were real, that is - only add to the spooky atmosphere.

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