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Libby's Dad


Libby's Dad Libby's Dad Libby's Dad

Libby's Dad back

Eleanor Davis

Price: 
6.00

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"Do you really not know what happened?"
"Don't tell her, she's too young."
"I am not."
"Libby's Mom told everyone that Libby's Dad said he was gonna shoot her. With his gun."
"WHAT? SHOOT LIBBY?"
"SHHH! No, shoot Libby's Mom."
"Oh my God!"

It's pool party time for the girls at the recently divorced titular dad's new house. He's even bought them all KFC, so he can't be that much of a nutter, right? Except Taylor's Mom clearly thinks he might be, because she's not let Taylor come, much to the other girls' dismay and disgust. Fun and frolics are being had by all, and Libby is enjoying hosting her friends, with nary a parental Armageddon in sight.

Later on in the day, though, when the girls are all settled down in their PJs enjoying a good old bedtime gossip, there's an unfortunate accident involving a bottle of nail polish and a pristine carpet. Ah... Suddenly, no one is too keen to tell Libby's Dad... But, what's there to worry about? He couldn't really be a headcase who might shoot someone just for ruining his brand new deep pile, could he...?

Ha ha, this took me straight back to a forgotten memory when, aged six, I accidently smashed my mother's favourite garden ornament - some grotesque, huge, fake Greek urn - with a badly placed football rocket shot (my five-a-side cohorts will tell you I haven't got much more accurate in the intervening four decades, either). I felt so distraught I sent all my mates home before slinking inside to confess. No idea why I was so worried, she was perfectly alright about it. My dad, meanwhile, was well chuffed as he'd always hated it! Libby's Dad, though...

Fantastic little bit of absurdity illustrated in a kaleidoscopic manner akin to the maestro of farce himself, Brecht THE MAKING OF Evens. Though where Brecht puts watercolours of every hue straight down without the need for pencils, Eleanor here uses nothing but. Pencils, that is. Though the only time she breaks out the regular grey boring type is for the speech bubbles and lettering!

I was particularly intrigued by the fact that she seems to have done most of the shading with a rough surface underneath, which due to the mild brass rubbing-esque effect, has given a subtle sense of additional texture and thus depth. I very much applaud the fact she seems to come up with a different style for practically every story she does as very neatly evidenced in her excellent HOW TO BE HAPPY collection, which featured one of Stephen's favourite covers of 2014!

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