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Rachel Rising vol 5: Night Cometh


Rachel Rising vol 5: Night Cometh Rachel Rising vol 5: Night Cometh

Rachel Rising vol 5: Night Cometh back

Terry Moore

Price: 
14.99

Page 45 Review by Stephen

"My grandfather was lynched with a rope like this. They took a photograph of him... lying on the road.
"His neck looked like yours."

The next two panels made me burst into tears.

Spoiler-free, I swear, this review is deployed to bring brand-new readers to one of the very best books in the business!

Terry Moore is the Georgie Porgie of comics: he kisses with kindness so making his readers cry.

It's not enough to show someone in pain: almost every other month for some fifteen years throughout STRANGERS IN PARADISE's epic, heart-felt run, Moore managed to summon the best in his characters to care for each other whenever tragedy struck or wrong decisions were made. Not necessarily immediately - who of us gets it right every time at the very first sign? - but in the long run. When the chips are down. When it is needed the most.

RACHEL RISING VOL 1 boasts one of the best-ever beginnings in comics:

Early one morning a tall and beautiful but austere blonde woman wanders down to a sequestered glade and waits patiently above a dried-up river bed. Until a leaf spontaneously combusts and another woman claws herself slowly... and painfully from her grave... then staggers her way back home...

That woman is Rachel. She's not a zombie, I can assure of that: she's fully mobile and completely cognizant but she is most emphatically dead. She just can't remember who killed her. All she has to go on is a couple of late-night snapshots of someone bearing down on her and the rope scars seared round her neck.

In the first arc of RACHEL RISING (volumes one to four) so much stuff happened which I am not about to ruin with spoilers. It was nasty and funny - oh, so funny, for Terry Moore has made a career out of combining comedy with tragedy in the best possible way, elevating each element through their juxtaposition - but one major question went unanswered: who killed Rachel and why?

Finally you will begin to receive answers but Terry is so good at scene-cutting! You think I am a tease on Twitter...? Terry has it down to a tee.

So much is going on here that you are left breathless, demanding to know what happens next to this party, that party or what seems like a most ill-advised sortie. There's one particular death which is very grizzly indeed.

The landscapes towards the end of the book are halting: crisp and crinkled leaves strewn upon winter's cold-baked, unyielding ground as a major character draws her last breaths and predators swoop down from above to peck out her eyes or stumble unsuspectingly from the dense foliage beyond.

But it's Terry Moore's rain that's most impressive of all: I was so sodden to the core that I had to towel myself down while keeping half an eye on Zoe just in case, just in case... For this eleven-year-old girl has a very sharp blade with a very long history and she is not afraid to use it.

Lastly for long-term readers: did something strike you as odd and unexpected about Aunt Johhny's [redacted]? Something slightly out of character about her [redacted]'s behaviour? Hahahaha! Terry must have been grinning his head off for months. It's all there and so obvious when you look back but not necessarily evident at the time. And that's the best sort of writing, is it not?

On a personal note:

"Someday I'm going to rent a big truck and ram it into every driver on the phone."

Includes exploding rodents.

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