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Rise Of The Black Flame


Rise Of The Black Flame Rise Of The Black Flame Rise Of The Black Flame Rise Of The Black Flame

Rise Of The Black Flame back

Mike Mignola, Chris Roberson & Christopher Mitten, Laurence Campbell

Price: 
19.98

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"Hear us, Great Darkness, whose skin burns with the brilliance of a million black fires of dissolution.
"You are the origin of all things, and devourer of all things.
"Your perfect song can be heard in the void, but also in the hum deep within all living things in this breathing world.
"Though having form, you are formless. Though you are without beginning, so are you without end.
"Your time comes again, Great Darkness.
"This life will end so that yours may begin again."

Oooo, when is sidebar not sidebar? When it's this blinking good, that's when! Fans of BPRD will be very familiar with the titular character who has cropped up as the main baddie in that most epic of series three times now, albeit in slightly different incarnations, plus made the odd guest appearance elsewhere such as in SLEDGEHAMMER 44 and LOBSTER JOHNSON.

What has not been explored up until now is his genesis. We know the original human host of the Flame, up to and including WW2, was one Raimund Diestel, often accompanied by his mysterious wife Kamala, before maniacal Landis Pope assumed the rather charred mantel in the modern day BPRD era.

This, then, explores just how the German naval deserter underwent his dramatic transmogrification to the supernatural psychopath, albeit one with impeccable manners, and that, perhaps, it was always his inescapable destiny. A path that indeed began many years previously with simple misstep as a small boy visiting a Berlin museum...

What a fantastic piece of horror writing this is. You never quite know with some of the Mignola-verse mini-series just how vital to the main story arcs they are, or indeed precisely how good they will be. The ABE SAPIEN material for example, is pretty essential reading, if you want to understand precisely what is going on in BPRD. But WITCHFINDER, LOBSTER JOHNSON etc., as fun as they are, can be a bit hit and miss for me and are not remotely essential. This mini provides much insight into the true nature of the Black Flame.

With that said, it also stands alone perfectly, you don't need to know anything about BPRD to be mesmerised by this gripping tale about two British Empire policemen stationed in Rangoon, Burma, heading into the steamy jungles of the sub-continent to investigate the disappearance of young girls. Not that anyone in authority was paying attention until it was two young English girls that were taken, of course...

As our redoubtable comrades head deeper and deeper into a shadowy world inhabited by cultish magicians and freakish monsters, you start to feel their trusty service revolvers might prove somewhat inadequate protection against such sorcerous adversaries. Fortunately for them, along the way they'll encounter a former colleague of Sir Edward WITCHFINDER Grey, a Miss Sarah Jewell, who'll prove far more valuable to their survival prospects than any bullet ever could.

But, as we know, the phoenix-like rise of the Black Flame is inevitable. Therefore the only question that remains is whether the young girls can be saved...?

Absolutely brilliant writing from Mignola and - with long-term collaborator and firm favourite of mine, Christopher Mitten on the pencils (finally making his Mignola-verse debut!), plus of course, Dave Stewart on colours - this is nigh-on perfect. Unless you're an ill-prepared policeman about to embark on an expedition to the very heart of darkness, that is...

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