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Safari Honeymoon


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Safari Honeymoon back

Jesse Jacobs

Price: 
10.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"When you spend as much time as I do out here you're sure to host a number of parasites.
"A few years back a parasite slipped into my mouth as I slept.
"It secured itself firmly at the base of my throat.
"Within a few minutes it had devoured my tongue and attached itself to the stub where my tongue used to be.
"It's still in there.
"The parasite behaves like a tongue, allowing me to function normally. It's really more of a symbiotic relationship than a parasitic one.
"My sense of taste has actually improved. That's why I'm such a talented chef.
"In return it takes a small portion of every bite of food I chew."

The jungle is a dangerous and unforgiving environment, that's for certain. Particularly this one, replete as it is with terrifying, multi-limbed beasts with huge teeth lurking behind every bush, telepathic simians with wibbly-wobbly antennae trying to take over your mind, and even foothills peppered with stroke-inducing temporal distortions. It's an odd choice for a romantic honeymoon getaway, that's for sure, but then the new groom, a successful businessman wanting to impress his new much younger trophy wife is used to getting what he wants.

Their guide, who cooks a mean grilled croque-monsieur with crème fraiche and gruyere topped with an organic quail egg, is having a hard time simultaneously keeping the newlyweds out of ever-present trouble, mostly of their own idiotic instigation, whilst whipping up a culinary storm over the campfire. Eventually, of course, matters do get psychotically, completely and surreally utterly out of control, but by then the not-so-happy couple are too busy just trying to stay alive to realise their travel insurance probably isn't going to cover this one...

Haha, I thought this was a brilliant bit of farce. The triumvirate of characters: the arrogant businessman, the doting trophy wife and the dashing guide are exaggerated up to suitably ridiculous levels. The ever-increasing disbelief of the businessman, still refusing to believe he can't get matters back under his control to the very bitter end, is hilarious. Even when he thinks he's not going to make it, he's lambasting his wife to make sure she sues the travel agency on his behalf!

Published by the same outfit that puts out much of Michael DeForge's output, Koyama Press, this is just as bonkers as anything he comes up with. The art reminds of both DeForge and also Huizenga.

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