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The Divine


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The Divine back

Boaz Lavie & Asaf Hanuka, Tomer Hanuka

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Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"All right, ladies. I'm only going to brief you once.
"We will descend approximately fifty feet into the lava tube.
"It's gonna be very dark in there.
"So we are gonna have to trust each other.
"Two men will monitor the entrance. Four will follow me inside.
"When it's all done we just need to make sure the receiver is fully exposed.
"So when the helicopter comes, they can remote detonate.
"And the place blows sky high.
"If anything goes wrong, at this point in the mission... my buddy here is an ex-con with four murder convictions. He'll make you regret the day you were born."
"What the hell, Jason?"
"Better to be feared than loved."

Well, there certainly isn't anyone who is going to love Jason, not now, not ever. He's somehow managed to bully and cajole his friend Mark into accompanying him on a CIA black ops mission to the Southeast Asian country of Quanlom, a country America officially has no diplomatic relations with. They both work for the CIA, but whilst Mark is a sensitive family man with a child well on the way, who just also happens to be a consulting civilian explosives expert, his old army 'buddy' Jason is a jacked-up jarhead who lives for the mission, preferably jungle-based ones which are as hazardous as possible.

On the face of it, this is a simple military mining contract, blowing up a mountain, but there is far more going on in Quanlom besides a civil war between the army and the guerrillas. As Jason and Mark's mission begins to unravel, they start to discover the legends of Leh, a spirit inhabiting and protecting the uplands, might not be quite so mythical after all.

Hot on the heels of THE REALIST, Asaf Hanuka and his brother Tomer (with whom he collaborated a long time ago on the short lived BIPOLAR series) combine to create a visually stunning collision of mythology and military might. Penned by Boaz Lavie, this story is very loosely inspired by Johnny and Luther Htoo, two twelve-year-old twins who led a splinter guerrilla group in Myanmar in the late 1990s, and who according to their foes where reputed to have magical powers. The children running the guerrilla group in this story, nine-year-old twins, are known locally as The Divine, one of whom really does have some magical and perhaps even telekinetic abilities. In any event they are most certainly a formidable fighting force.

As Mark becomes increasingly uneasy over the mission objectives, and Jason's gung ho behaviour, he finds himself in a moral quandary. He makes his decision, but by then the decisive conflict between the world of the physical and that of the supernatural is utterly unavoidable. The climactic battle is an artistic delight, as huge colourful spirit demons assault the military camp, defended by desperate defenders armed with RPGs and machine guns.

There were elements of this work that minded me a little of AKIRA from an artistic perspective. I am thinking particularly of a sequence where the powered twin is levitating and almost in a warped berserker state. There will certainly be people who pick this up purely for the art, but it's also an excellent clash of cultures, and morals, story. I can see why this garnered much critical acclaim when released in France earlier this year. My only minor complaint is I would have liked it to be two or three times as long!

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