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The Sons Of El Topo vol 1: Cain h/c


The Sons Of El Topo vol 1: Cain h/c The Sons Of El Topo vol 1: Cain h/c The Sons Of El Topo vol 1: Cain h/c The Sons Of El Topo vol 1: Cain h/c

The Sons Of El Topo vol 1: Cain h/c back

Alejandro Jodorowsky & Jose Ladronn

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14.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"Oh, father, I cannot kill you, but I can kill your son..."

Which despite Alejandro Jodorowsky being completely bonkers and the original film 'El Topo' being the weirdest Western ever made by some considerable distance, is not some suicidal statement of intent - because, let's face it, that would make for a pretty short sequel - but instead a fraternal threat. Here's some mumbling mojo from the peyoted-up publisher to confuse us more...

"The sequel to cult film, El Topo, from controversial filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky.

El Topo was a bandit without limits, a man with no moral compass, but when his journey through the arid west brought him face to face with a series of rogue outcasts, he found enlightenment in the unlikeliest place and was forever transformed, becoming a holy vessel imbued with the power to perform miracles. This was a journey that took him far from his first born son, Cain, and brought about the birth of Abel.

Fuelled by resentment, and unable to kill his saintly father, Cain begins the slow pursuit of his half brother in a tale of magic and mayhem worthy of legendary filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky and virtuosic illustrator José Ladrönn. Together, they deliver an allegorical and surrealist western where the genre is at the service of deeper philosophical and spiritual considerations."

Right, first things first, to clear up any nonsensical goings-on in the names department... If you are a fan of the film, you might well remember - or not depending on how battered you were when you last watched El Topo - that his son was actually called Hijo, which simply means 'son' in Spanish. So, somewhere along the line, he is now known as Cain. Which, given the mock- / mocking Christianity elements to this subsequent story, will all make complete sense* when you read it.

Hardcore fans of the film will probably love this. It's a well-told engaging yarn which certainly hits its marks (and targets) in terms of Jodorowsky's usual obsessions ...and targets. It's beautifully illustrated by José Ladrönn too. I think it is a testament to both Jodorowsky's story-telling powers and Ladrönn's artistry that this work also stands up extremely well as a stand-alone story. People who have never seen the original film can enjoy this all by itself as there's sufficient enough cleverly woven in recapitulation to make total perfect sense** of what has gone before.

* Maybe...

** Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

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