Non-Fiction  > Mental Health

Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind


Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind

Thin Slices Of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind back

Catherine LePage

Price: 
9.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"I always simultaneously see two sides of the same coin."

Those two sides being, dear reader, the good side but also the bad side... For if one is prone to anxiety there is no resting on the proverbial laurels, for any scant moments of quiet contentment are surely about to be interrupted by the next display of internal disquiet?! But fret ye not! For as the publisher pronounces...

"Not to worry, a book on anxiety is finally here! A clever antidote to everyday angst, this illustrated book captures universal truths and comforting revelations about being human. Artist Catherine Lepage uses her wry humour to help us see that when thinly sliced and illustrated, emotions are much easier to digest."

Yes she does. Honest, witty and very engaging indeed, this pocket packet of perturbation pacification deals with the causes and effects of Catherine's personal crushing concerns as she prescribes sautéing up the stresses to ensure they don't induce too much unnecessary agitation.

I found much to enjoy in this work as it has been created with genuine tenderness and understanding but also includes much hard-won hilarity. It's therefore an intimate, engaging look at what is for most people who suffer from it in one form or another, a very personal problem. I particularly enjoyed how Catherine unpicked and analysed her own predilections to precipitating an onset of anxious thoughts...

"Chapter 4.
"Okay, I'll admit...
"It's a bit my fault as well."

When we get the punchline that concludes this chapter as well as the book, I had a little a chuckle to myself. Forgiveness is very important. Particularly of oneself. I thought it was a delightfully insightful conclusion.

Artistically, the slices of illustration that accompany Catherine's calamity-controlling conceptions will appeal to fans of David Shrigley, I suspect. It's not as bonkers all-out insane, for sure, but it has more than a little of that deliberately rough and ready absurdity slapping you about the face sensibilities at times.

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