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The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins


The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins

The Wormworld Saga vol 1: The Journey Begins back

Daniel Lieske

Price: 
8.99

Page 45 Review by Stephen

Full-colour pre-teen fantasy in which a young boy called Jonas, staying at his beloved Grandma's during the long summer holidays, finds that his father isn't going to allow him the freedom to roam the idyllic countryside all day long, without some serious commitment to home work. Fortunately an older friend has leant him his old maths notes under the impression they'll be used for "revision". They won't. Instead, Jonas presents them to his dad as maths questions answered each afternoon and, to begin with, this hoodwink pays off.

"Well, I can't find any mistakes. Very good!"
"Our Jonas is a bright little boy!"

Jonas is pretty pleased with himself. "Man, did I feel smart!"

So it is that the lad enjoys each thrilling morning racing round the ancient woodland with grandma's dog, Lotti, protected by his trusty wooden sword and enchanted, chain-mail armoured vest (it's a red woollen pullover knitted by his gran) and imagining the most extreme adventures, as you do!

"Flying monkeys! Quick, we must hide!"

You can see Lotti, excited by Jonas's infectious energy, thinking, "What?! Where?! Whatever, this is fun!" while of course crossing a brook by footbridge is the most dangerous task imaginable. "Careful! Don't fall into the abyss!"

If you don't recognise this as your own imaginative child's play, I feel awful for you. But if you think that the glorious countryside colours so far are spectacular, with bright summer light streaming through the canopies up above, then, boy, are you in for an eye-popping upgrade!

So what's Jonas up to in the afternoons instead of all that homework in preparation for whatever new school his dad has arranged for him? Why, he's playing more made-up games with his toys or concentrating on drawing the blue butterflies he's encountered or creatures he conjures up in his head. Not only that, but he's doing it in his own secret den, a fully furnished room even his grandma's unaware of, accessed through a hidden panel in his bedroom wall. He's known about this for years, he's just never figured out - or even thought to figure out - why it's there, who built it or what it's really for. But when one of his insect crayon creations bursts unexpectedly into neon-pink life and buzzes through further passageways entirely new to Jonas, he's shocked to discover -

His father calls him down to dinner. His dad's coming up the stairs.

Racing back as fast as he can lest his bolthole be discovered, and grabbing a few sheaths of maths notes from his satchel in a hurry, Jonas fails to notice that these have already been marked by his friend's teacher, and the poor lad's holiday is about to come crashing down around him.

The confrontation is brutal. From the start you can tell that Jonas's dad, with his stuffy moustache, doesn't really get him and that they're not close, which is why those annual holidays at his grandma's are so cherished. But whoa, wait for this!

"I'm very disappointed in you, Jonas." No, wait. "And your mother would have been too!"

Now, this hyper-real, computer-generated art isn't my personal thing, but younger readers will adore it, there is no question of the exceptionally communicative craft, and even I found myself so empathising with young Jonas here, as he looks straight at the reader, that I choked at his tears. (And no, this isn't Jonathan, for once; this is Stephen!) There is little more cruelly hurtful that you can say to someone than "The person you loved most in the world who is now dead would be disappointed in you".

Oh, and there's another bombshell detonated alongside: his father's booked him in to boarding school. Please pass your own moral judgements at that one.

Grounded to his room for the rest of the holidays, and doomed to far worse in the Fall, once Jonas recovers his composure he realises that he still has an escape route, for through the secret passageway then further up ladders he found hours earlier lies that beacon of light which so startled him: a painting. It's a painting that leads to another world entirely and, as I implied earlier, if you think the colours so far have been radiant, are you in for an eye-dazzling treat!

I wouldn't normally take you half this far (see PERSEPHONE) but I'm pretty sure that it won't be pre-teens who'll be reading this, but those looking to buy for them instead.

Beyond the veil lie landscapes of fluorescent flora, twisted, mossy tree trunks, purple, puffy canopies you can fall through, giant, carnivorous insects... and someone who's been waiting for Jonas for quite some time. Make that two people, one of whom has been dispatched to find the boy, then keep him safe.

Oh wait - make that three, I'm afraid.

Did I mention that the door shut behind him? Oh dear.

Please note: the interior art I have for you here was screen-grabbed from the original online series. It was a great deal easier than scavenging what little I found of the published graphic novel online, and allowed me to illustrate more precisely what I had written. The lettering has since been changed to lower case, and captions slightly rearranged on the page, but I could discern no discrepancies in the actual script. I've done my best to preserve the pages' actual content, although in one instance, with Jonah in tears, that proved impossible.

There's certainly nothing here which you won't find within. It's all a bit beautiful, isn't it?

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