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Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c


Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c

Amazing Spider-Man: Epic Collection vol 2 - Great Responsibility s/c back

Stan Lee & Steve Ditko

Price: 
35.99

Page 45 Review by Stephen

"I did it! I'm free!"

Quite an iconic moment there as Ditko's Spider-Man lifts himself from under tonnes of steel fallen into the water of Doc Ock's subaquatic dome. The willpower comes from the certain knowledge that without the serum he's stolen, Aunt May will surely die.

I have that iconic sequence for you in full, under its relevant cover. Note how Peter's weighted down not just by the machinery (and pressure) but also by the number of panels which gradually give way as he exerts increasing upward pressure.

The sad truth is, that, metaphysically speaking, poor Peter will never be free, no matter how much he tries to atone for the death of Uncle Ben, and Aunt May has more trips to the hospital bed ahead of her than Florence Nightingale managed in her medical career.

If you look carefully you'll find some exemplary body language and facial expressions in Steve Ditko's art.

Just take pages 8 and 9 of #31. Page 8, panel four, shows a college student gesturing over and away from his head with an "I've clocked you" hand signal whilst the girl catching up with him reaches out to grab his attention instead. In panel six, meanwhile, Gwen Stacy's eyelashes are Rimmelled up to the Max Factor, far more of a vamp than John Romita's imminent swinging-sixties' doll which is what she needed to be to attract poor Peter later on. Meanwhile, Flash and Harry's contempt for poor Peter (I'm not sure it's possible to type "Peter" without "poor") in the following panel is obvious (Flash's is a face-palm "D'Oh!" whereas Harry's sneer is simply withering), but on page 9 panel six shows Peter in a phone booth asking the hospital about his Aunt's condition, and his expression is one of forlorn, selfless anxiety, no weaker for its puppyish purity.

As a bonus Ditko's pencils to #31 are reprinted in the back, along with his original cover to #35.

The Green Goblin becomes a virtual co-star in a substantial subplot which will explode next volume when John Romita Sr. takes over the art.

In the meantime, Peter Parker finds his first love affair swimming swiftly down the swanny when Ned Leeds returns to the arms of Betty Brant who's always looked a bit weird, no more so than on page 15 of #25 in her frosty face-off with Liz Allan, her blonde twin / clone with a perm.

"Well! Fancy meeting you here, Miss Allan! Do you always travel in a pack like that??"
"Why, no, Miss Brant! But sometimes it's hard to get rid of all my admirers! I'm sure you don't have that problem!"

They've both come to see Peter and they're actually fighting over him. And yes, that is indeed the first appearance of Mary Jane Watson, her face hidden behind a drooping dahlia, her hair within a headscarf, introduced to Liz and Betty by Auntie May:

"Mary Jane, this is Betty Brant, and this is Liz Allan! Girls, I'd like you to meet Mary Jane Watson! She just dropped in to visit my nephew!"
"Hel-lo, girls!" she sings, musical notes floating to emphasise her self-confidence.

"She's a friend of Peter's??" thinks Betty, incredulously. "She looks like a screen star!"
"He's been hiding her from us??" puzzles Liz. "Our shy, bashful, studious Peter Parker??!"

No, he's never met her and won't for many more issues as Mary Jane continues to "drop in" to visit Aunt May's nephew while (poor) Peter Parker is otherwise engaged as a metahuman punch-bag. That's what he's been hiding from you, ladies. Ooooh, the irony of it all!

Contains AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #18-38 and Annual #2.

The first page of #27 looks a little bit dodgy. I wonder what the title means?

For far more substantial Stan-Lee satire (I was gentle here, but normally I really cannot help myself), please see AMAZING SPIDER-MAN EPIC VOL 1, FANTASTIC FOUR EPIC VOL 1 plus AVENGERS EPIC VOL 1 and VOL 2 which does actually contain a commendable tirade about racism.

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