Fiction  > Literary Adaptations / Continuations  > Rivers Of London

Rivers Of London: Body Work


Rivers Of London: Body Work Rivers Of London: Body Work Rivers Of London: Body Work

Rivers Of London: Body Work back

Ben Aaronovitch, Andrew Cartmel & Lee Sullivan

Price: 
13.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"My name is Inspector Nightingale, Mr Debben. I hope you don't mind me letting myself in...
"... and I'm afraid no one goes home just yet...
"... this was merely the beginning..."

I'll have to confess I haven't read the Rivers Of London prose books penned by Ben Aaronovitch, but I have had a fair few customers recommend them, so that probably explains why this series was relatively popular in comics form. So much so in fact, it has been expanded from a mini-series into an ongoing one. In a nutshell it's basically Inspector Morse meets HELLBLAZER. Dapper grizzled humourless veteran cop Inspector Nightingale and his amusing, hardworking sidekick Peter Grant fight crime in the big smoke. Except the twist is the crimes are all of the supernatural variety. They even have their own division, the Special Assessment Unit, known colloquially within the Met, and viewed with equally measures of suspicion and derision by the rank and file plod, as 'Falcon' or 'The Folly.'

This case starts with a drowning in the Thames, a poor unfortunate unable to get out of their car in time after it careered through the barriers. It is, on the face of it, an open and shut case of accidental death. But once Grant receives a tip-off from the daughter of the Goddesses of the River Thames that magic may be involved, our dynamic duo get to work working out who or what is responsible for our victim taking the plunge. Inspector Nightingale's mystical prowess is comparable to one John Constantine, with some impressive, show-stopping, indeed life-saving displays of legerdemain. Peter Grant, well, he's more of a Tommy Cooper standard.

I really enjoyed this work. For a start off, the plot is a relatively involved affair, the main characters have some genuine depth, so Aaronovitch is clearly a decent writer, though when you have a co-author as with Andrew Cartmel here, you're never quite sure just how much the prose author has contributed. The art is pretty decent fare too from Lee Sullivan. It very strongly minded me of Chris THE TWELVE / MINISTRY OF SPACE Weston, which is never a bad thing. Definitely one for fans of the prose books, but perhaps also HELLBLAZER fans needing an extra mystical fix.

spacer