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The Book Of Hope h/c


The Book Of Hope h/c The Book Of Hope h/c The Book Of Hope h/c The Book Of Hope h/c

The Book Of Hope h/c back

Tommi Musturi

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25.99

Page 45 Review by Jonathan

"Sniff. Sniff. What's that smell?"
"Ahem... must be the dog."
"The dog's been dead for years."
"Well... I guess it's me then. Tee-hee. The truth may lurk anywhere."

I reviewed the second slice of this work in its individual self-published form and was greatly tickled. This collected edition of THE BOOK OF HOPE from Fantagraphics is surrealism at its most elegant, and indeed eloquent. The simplest way I can start to describe this material is that it has the feel of Chris Ware's JIMMY CORRIGAN, albeit living in a cabin in the arse end of nowhere. Tone-wise too this is just as downbeat and melancholic as Jimmy's urban non-exploits, but there are some significant differences.

For whilst Jimmy is a kind and simple mouse of a man, destined to never succeed, instead being continually trampled and trammelled down by life (and his relatives), here our middle-aged, moustachioed married lead is left wistfully wondering how it all got away from him. Just how did he end up right here in this moment, in this place, so far removed from anything? And yet, there are also fond, nostalgic reminiscences of joyful moments long since gone which raise a smile. An unusual palette of tertiary colours, purples and mustards, only adds to the backwoodsy, isolated feel.

For the most part, though, there is silent contemplative acceptance of his lot, punctuated with daydreaming moments and extended sequences of inner flights of fantasy or the occasional utterance of some choice savant philosophy to no one in particular. Here's one such soliloquy offered to the universe, brought on by staring into the remaining eye of a tatty old childhood teddy bear whilst attempting a bucolic bowel movement on the outside privy at in the lonely cold depths of night, full moon shining down through wispy clouds and bats fluttering through the air...

"Childhood ends when the fight begins.
"Youth fades when the word falls from your lips for the first time.
"Say it slowly, and you can hold on to it for an instant...
"... before you are overwhelmed by the wary weight of midlife...
"... you console yourself, saying...
"... perhaps there was no before..."

Movement complete. I was too. Moved, that is...

That was my review of one of the five chapters that form this work. So if that was a movement, then the whole book really is a glorious symphony of sanguine reflection. Obviously, given symphonies have four movements, and although each chapter does have a different emotional tone, my metaphor breaks down rather quickly, but you get my point!

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